Via
Via
"Certainly, a clear line must be preserved by strict discipline, and on the other hand the men must know that everything is done for them that hard times permit. On the top of that it follows that, among real men, what counts is deeds, not words; and then it comes of itself, when such are the relations between men and their leaders, that instead of opposition there is harmony between them. The leader is merely a clearer expression of the common will and an example of life and death. And there is no science in all this. It is a practical quality, the simple manly commonsense that is native to a sound and vigorous race."
 Ernst Jünger, Copse 125: A Chronicle from the Trench Warfare of 1918.
Via
Via

            Do you realize that within the life-time of men now living, within a hundred years, or a hundred and thirty years at the most, all the material conditions under which man lives his life on this earth have been more completely revolutionized than during all the ages of recorded history which preceded? My great-grandfather lived essentially the same kind of life, so far as external conditions were concerned, as did his Assyrian prototype 6,000 years ago.

    Joseph McCabe1825-1925: A Century of Stupendous Progress, G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1926. 

Via
Via
"Quando amamos platonicamente, o amor pode durar muito tempo. Pois não tem ninguém para estragar nossa idealização. Não há convivência para nos desafiar. É uma paixão estanque, feita de sonho e névoa. É uma vontade desligada da realidade. Temos a expectativa intacta, longe de contratempos. Acordamos e dormimos com o mesmo sentimento longe de interrupção em nossa fantasia."
   Fabrício Carpinejar.

  Spanish Civil War. Convento de la Concepción Francisca o de las Concepcionistas, Toledo.


        Photographer: Pelayo Mas Castañeda. [x]

  Spanish Civil War. Convento de la Concepción Francisca o de las Concepcionistas, Toledo.

        Photographer: Pelayo Mas Castañeda. [x]

Via
"Eu absolutamente não tenho prazer em estimular algo que eu, por vezes, caí com tanta indulgência. Não foi pela busca do prazer que eu tenho arriscado a vida, a reputação e a razão. Foi apenas uma desesperada tentativa de escapar de memórias torturantes, de um senso de insuportável solidão e o horror de alguma estranha maldição repentina."
   Edgar Allan Poe.
Via

     As suggested above, sons were not the property of the father in Lycurgan Sparta, but the common property of the state. Unlike other Greek and Roman states, in Sparta the decision to raise a child rested with a council of elders who checked babies for health and stamina. If one was ill born and deformed it was discarded, as life “which nature had not well equipped at the very beginning for health and strength was of no advantage either for itself or the state.”

In many cases, Spartan children were not even the product of random parentage, “but designed to spring from the best there was.” Eugenics. During his time of exile, Lycurgus noticed something peculiar about Greek men. In Athens, Plutarch explains, he saw men arguing over the particular breeding stock of certain dogs and horses. And yet, these same men sired children even though “foolish, infirm, or diseased, as though children of bad stock did not owe their badness to their parents.” Marriages and births were carefully regulated, then, always with an eye to the physical and political wellbeing of the city.

Because of the Lycurgan exaggeration of the Greek educational ideal, Plutarch exclaimed that the education of Spartan children began before birth – an extraordinary concept, considering the 7th Century (B.C.) context. In reality it began prior to conception. Which brings us to Spartan women as mothers. Uniquely in the Classical Greek world, Spartan women exercised alongside men. They ran, wrestled, and threw the discuss and javelin, so that they might struggle successfully and easily with childbirth, and that their offspring would have a “vigorous root in vigorous bodies.

    Mark DyalLycurgus & the Spartan State.